Cancer Care

  • Alcohol and Cancer

    Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of cancer. 

  • Beat the Holiday Blues

    An estimated 10 percent of the population suffers from holiday depression to some degree. It may be one or many things that contribute to the holiday blues, especially coping with a cancer diagnosis. 

  • Cancer Care - Patient Education

    Cancer Care - Patient Education General Cancer Care Alcohol and Cancer Beat the Holiday Blues Cancer Diagnostic Tests and Blood Tests Word List Cancer Word List for Patients Food Safety for People who are Immunisuprresed I want to Help My Parent Quit Smoking Increase Your Actitivty and Reduce Cancer Risk Indoor Tanning Loss of Loved Ones During Holidays Peripheral Neuropathy in Persons with Cancer Preventing Arm Swelling After Breast Cancer Surgery And Radiation Radiation Therapy - What to Expect Radon Testing Kits Reduce Your Risk of Cancer Safer Grilling Tips Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Smokeless Tobacco Smoking Quiz Summer Sun Safety The Complete Blood Count: A Guide for Patients with Cancer Tips for Better Sleep for Cancer Patients Tumor Marker Tests What Men Should Know About Testicular Cancer What You Should Know About Cervical Cancer and Pap Tests Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome (BRRS) This material supplements information provided by physicians, nurses, genetic counselors, and other members of your health care team about Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley syndrome. It does not replace regular medical care or discussions with your health care team. If you see an unfamiliar term, please see the Glossary of Terms at the end of this material. Are Tests for Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome Available? Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome (BRRS): A guide for patients and their families Common Characteristics of Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome and Cowden Syndrome Glossary of Terms How is Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome Inherited? Printable References Resources and Support Groups That's Not the Name My Doctor Gave Me What Causes Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome? What is Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley Syndrome (BRRS)? What Should I Be Doing About This Condition? What to Expect With Chemotherapy Chemotherapy means treatment with chemicals or medicine. Most people use the term, chemotherapy or "chemo," to mean treatment of cancer with medicines. Chemotherapy is one of the types of treatment for cancer. Surgery, for instance, removes the cancerous tumor. Radiation therapy kills cancer cells that are in the radiation’s beam. Immunotherapy helps rid the body of cancer by making the body’s immune system stronger. Chemotherapy stops or slows the growth and division of cancer cells. Sometimes it takes all four of those cancer treatments to cure or control certain cancers. Cancer: When to Call Your Doctor Caring For Your Hair and Skin During Chemo or Radiation Chemotherapy: What Can Be Done About Side Effects Dealing with Cancer Therapy Hair Loss Types of Chemotherapy What Are the Side Effects of Anti-Cancer Drugs? What to Expect With Chemotherapy Why and How is Chemotherapy Given? Colon Cancer Facts Get all the facts with this easy to understand in-depth guide on colon cancer. We'll cover causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatments and more. Colon Cancer Facts Colorectal Cancer Awareness: It saves lives How is Colon Cancer Diagnosed? Possible Signs of Colon Cancer Stages of Colon Cancer Treatment of Colon Cancer Who is at Risk for Colon Cancer? Cowden Syndrome This material supplements information provided by physicians, nurses, genetic counselors, and other members of your health care team about Cowden syndrome. It does not replace regular medical care or discussions with your health care team. If you see an unfamiliar term, please see the Glossary of Terms at the end of this material. Are Tests for Cowden Syndrome Available? Check Yourself: Are You Getting the Screening You Need? Common Characteristics of Cowden Syndrome Cowden Syndrome: A guide for patients and their families How is Cowden Syndrome Diagnosed? How is Cowden Syndome Inherited? Printable References Resources and Support Groups That's Not the Name My Doctor Gave Me What Causes Cowden Syndrome? What is Cowden Syndrome? What Should I Be Doing About This Condition? Managing Eating Problems During Cancer Treatment Following are some problems you may experience during cancer treatment. Learn ways to prevent or help these symptoms. Constipation Diarrhea Difficulty Swallowing and Chewing Dry Mouth Food Safety Gas and Bloating Loss of Appetite or Weight Managing Eating Problems During Cancer Treatment Nausea and Vomiting Sore Mouth Taste Changes Thoughts for the Caregiver/Cook Too Tired to Cook Smoking Teens Smoking Teens Holden Cancer Tips Each month staff members of the Cancer Information Service at Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center publish Cancer Tips for a broad group of readers. Cancer Tips provide guidelines for living a healthier, cancer-free life. Supporting Cancer Patients (July 2012) Colon Cancer - Get Screened (March 2012) HPV and Head and Neck Cancers (February 2012) Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing (October 2011) Survivorship (June 2011) Preventing Melanoma (May 2011) April is Cancer Clinic Trials Awareness Month (April 2011) Coping with the Holidays as a Caregiver (December 2010) Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month (November 2010) Breast Cancer Screening: A personal choice made with your doctor (October 2010) Why Should You Be Concerned About Radon? (April 2010) Colon Cancer (March 2010) Radon Alert (January 2010) Coping with Cancer During the Holidays (December 2009) Benefits of Quitting Smoking (November 2009) Risk of Lymphedema for Breast Cancer Survivors (October 2009) Gynecology Cancers Awareness Month (September 2009) All Childhood Cancer Survivors Should Be Followed by a Doctor Which Sunscreen is Right for Me? (July 2009) Why Should I Participate in a Clinic Trial? (May 2009) Do I Live in a Cancer Cluster or Belt (April 2009)

  • Cancer Diagnostic Tests and Blood Tests Word List

    Diagnostic tests and blood tests word list

  • Cancer Word List for Patients

    The Cancer Information Service provides this Cancer Word List to describe terms that may be used in this process so that patients and family members can take an active role in their care. 

  • Food Safety For People Who Are Immunosuppressed

    Food Safety For People Who Are Immunosuppressed The immune system helps protect you from infection. When your immune system is weakened, it may not be able to rid the body of the bacteria found in some foods. By not eating

  • I Want to Help My Parent Quit Smoking

    Quitting smoking is tough. So is talking to your mom, dad or anyone you love about quitting. Remember, you can’t make them quit but you can let them know that you’re there for them if they want to try. We provide few tips for encouraging someone you love to quit smoking. 

  • Increase Your Activity and Reduce Cancer Risk

    You don’t have to have special equipment or buy a fancy gym membership to be physically active. Simple fun activities with your family and friends can reduce your cancer risk.

  • Indoor Tanning

     Both UVA and UVB rays cause damage to skin cells and can lead to skin cancer. UV rays are recognized as a main cause of all skin cancers. All tanning beds use UV rays. 

  • Loss of Loved Ones During Holidays

    When a loved one has died, the holidays can be very stressful for the spouse, the family members, and friends. As the season approaches, the Cancer Information Service offers some helpful hints to observe these events without your loved one. 

  • Pap Tests and Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is 100 percent curable if detected early and can be detected by a Pap test.  

  • Peripheral Neuropathy In Persons with Cancer

    Peripheral neuropathy is a term used to describe sick or injured nerves. The peripheral nerves are the ones located outside your brain and spinal cord. 

  • Preventing Arm Swelling After Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation

    Swelling of the arm on the side of your breast cancer surgery can be due to lymph nodes under the arm being removed or changed by radiation of the armpit.  

  • Prostate Cancer

    Health information about prostate cancer, including statistics and symptoms.

  • Radiation Therapy - What to Expect

    Radiation therapy is the treatment of cancer using beams of high-energy waves called radiation. The radiation used for cancer treatment comes from special machines or from radioactive substances. Radiation therapy machines aim specific amounts of the radiation at tumors or parts of the body where there is/was disease to kill cancer cells or keep them from spreading.   

  • Radon Testing Kits

    Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas. You can't see, smell or taste radon. But it may be a problem in your home. 

  • Reduce Your Risk of Cancer

    Ways to reduce your risk of cancer in your everyday routine. 

  • Safer Grilling Tips

    Alternative ways to grill while keeping your food safe and your family healthy. 

  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    The lymph glands and vessels serve as channels through which liquid around the cells (extra cellular fluid) is returned into the blood stream.  Any patient with invasive breast cancer or melanoma can be considered for sentinel lymph node biopsy.  

  • Smokeless Tobacco

    Smokeless tobacco is unburnt tobacco, which is placed into the mouth used by an estimated 12-14 million Americans.  Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smoking and ultimately leads to an increased risk of oral cancer.  

  • Smoking Quiz

    If you think you know all there is to know about smoking, take our quiz. 

  • Stay Safe in the Summer Sun

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S., but is largely preventable by reducing exposure to the sun.  Review some important tips to keep your skin safe.  

  • The Complete Blood Count: A Guide for Patients with Cancer

    This booklet will explain about the normal cells that can be damaged that are made in the bone marrow. 

  • Tips for Better Sleep for Cancer Patients

    The amount of sleep a person needs varies from person to person. During cancer treatment, the need for sleep may increase some, as the body repairs itself.  

  • Tumor Marker Tests

    Tumor markers are substances that can be detected in higher than normal amounts in the blood, urine, or body tissues of some people with certain types of cancer.   

  • What Is Cancer?

    What Is Cancer? The answer to that question is not as clear as you might think. A dictionary definition states that cancer is “a malignant and invasive growth or tumor, tending to recur after excision and to metastasize to other sites.”  However, not all growths that are designated as “cancer” behave in that manner. The determination of whether the word “cancer” is included in the medical name of a growth when it is removed and examined under the microscope was established many decades ago at a time when we knew much less about how such growths behave.  We now know that some growths that have cancer in their name can grow very, very slowly and never metastasize (spread) or cause health problems.  These growths might never have been detected at all without modern diagnostic tools. If left alone, they would be clinically insignificant. Sonia Sugg, MD explains what IORT is, as well as the benefits and eligibility criteria of this unique procedure. The linkage of the word “cancer” with these abnormalities can cause psychological distress and in some cases lead patients to seek, and doctors to provide, therapy that may not be necessary.  Our persistent use of the word “cancer” where it is not indicated can therefore result in unnecessary psychological, physical and financial damage. On the other hand, there is no question that early detection of cancer saves lives, and that detecting and treating aggressive cancers early is playing a major role in the decreasing age-adjusted mortality from cancer.  For example, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently highlighted the value of screening CT scans for cigarette smokers at high risk of lung cancer (http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/draftrec.htm). Many decades of experience, and scientific advances, have improved our ability to link both the microscopic appearance of a growth, and its molecular makeup, with a good or a poor outcome.  This ongoing field of research is helping us figure out which growths should be called cancer and need to be treated, and which can just be monitored without therapy. It is therefore not surprising that a reassessment is ongoing of what should be called “cancer”.  This is the topic of a recent publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1722196) and a recent New York Times editorial  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/29/report-suggests-sweeping-changes-to-cancer-detection-and-treatment/?hp. New names for growths that are current called cancer but behave in a benign fashion will likely be adopted.  One proposed name is IDLE (Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin). Moving forward, progress against cancer will be dependent on prevention, early detection and better therapy.  It will also be dependent on our ability to know who needs therapy, and who does not.  A more precise use of the word “cancer” will help. George Weiner, MD Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center Director July 2013 

  • What Men Should Know About Testicular Cancer

    Over all, about one in 280 American men will develop testicular cancer at some time in their lives. It can occur in men at any age and is most common cancer in men between 20 and 35.