University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

University of Iowa Health Care
Iowa Assessment for Men Result Summary

The UI Health Care Men's Health Clinic invites you to answer a few questions that will help you identify potential health concerns. Your answers are completely anonymous, and will not be stored or transmitted.

You'll be able to print your results for sharing with your physician. The feedback you receive is not meant to replace your own physician’s advice.

Age, Height, and Weight { 1 of 5 }

Please check your response.

Height Please check your responses.

Please check your response.

About your heart… { 2 of 5 }

Do you wake from sleep short of breath or have difficulty lying flat in bed? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you have swelling of your ankles or legs? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you experience an irregular heart rhythm, dizziness, or fainting? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you experience discomfort in your chest, arms or neck during exertion? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you experience shortness of breath with exertion? Please select an appropriate response.

Over the past two weeks, how often have you been bothered by either of the following problems? { 3 of 5 }

Little interest or pleasure in doing things Please select an appropriate response.
Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless Please select an appropriate response.

How are you sleeping? { 4 of 5 }

Do you snore loudly enough to be heard through closed doors? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you often feel tired, fatigued or sleepy during the daytime? Please select an appropriate response.
Has anyone observed you stop breathing during your sleep? Please select an appropriate response.
Do you have high blood pressure? Please select an appropriate response.
Is your neck circumference (dress shirt neck size) greater than 15.5 inches? Please select an appropriate response.

Energy and sexual health { 5 of 5 }

How would you rate your energy level? Please select an appropriate response.
How would you rate your libido (sex drive)? Please select an appropriate response.
How do you rate your confidence that you could get and keep an erection? Please select an appropriate response.
If you were to spend the rest of your life with the way that you presently urinate, how would you feel about that? Please select an appropriate response.

Body Mass Index (BMI)

Learn more about the body mass index

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

What is it?

The body mass index is a numerical value of your weight in relation to your height. BMIs are good indicators of healthy weights for adults, regardless of body frame size.

The BMI Calculator is not accurate for all body types. It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have a muscular build and may underestimate body fat in older persons and others who have lost muscle.

To assess if your weight is within a healthy range for your body type, contact your health care provider.

What you can do now about your weight

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our primary care team.
  2. Ask your doctor these questions about your present weight:
    1. Do I need to lose weight for my health?
    2. What are my blood sugar and cholesterol levels?
    3. How much physical activity do I need to maintain a healthy weight?
    4. What is a healthy eating plan for me?

Heart Health

Learn more about coronary artery disease and heart health

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD) include:

  • chest pain
  • shortness of breath
  • unexplained fatigue
  • lightheadedness

Causes

CAD results from the buildup of fatty deposits in the heart's arteries. The buildups cause the arteries to narrow and become blocked, reducing blood and oxygen flow to the heart.

Who is at risk?

Men over 50 have a greater risk of CAD. Other indicators are family history of heart disease, alcohol and tobacco use, and physical inactivity.

Diagnosis and Treatment

If tests and imaging show the presence of CAD, treatment options may include medications, a procedure to physically unblock the arteries using surgery or a catheterization, and assistance in making lifestyle changes through cardiac rehabilitation.

What you can do now about coronary artery disease

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our Internal Medicine care team.
  2. If your primary care provider has asked you to see a heart specialist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our heart care team.

Emotional Well-Being

Learn more about clinical depression

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Signs of Depression

Clinical depression is a mood disorder characterized by overwhelming feelings of sadness, loss of pleasure, guilt and hopelessness that interfere with daily life.

Causes

Genetic, biologic, and environmental factors play a role in depression.

Who is at risk?

Depression is an illness that can affect anyone at any time in their life.

  • Adults ages 49-54 are the age group with the highest rates of depression.
  • While women have twice the rate of depression than men, the disease is not rare in men.
  • Research suggests that depression in men may be associated with
    • low tolerance to stress
    • impulsive behaviors
    • a history of alcohol or substance abuse
    • a family history of depression or suicide

Diagnosis and Treatment

Your primary care physician may ask questions that might lead to further screenings and/or treatment. A mental health professional may administer a more comprehensive screening test and use it along with observed symptoms to make a diagnosis. Treatments are tailored to the patient and his condition. Options include counseling therapy and medications.

What you can do now about depression

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our Internal Medicine care team.
  2. If your primary care provider has asked you to see a mental health specialist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our psychiatry care team.

Sleep Apnea

Learn more about sleep apnea.

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Signs of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Partners or other family members might notice the person begins snoring heavily soon after falling asleep and the snoring gets louder. The snoring can be interrupted by a long silent period when there is no breathing. The pause is followed by a loud snort or gasp as the person attempts to breathe.

People with sleep apnea probably are not aware that they stop breathing intermittently during sleep. Sleep apnea can be associated with morning headaches, fatigue, high blood pressure, heart burn, problems concentrating or mood and memory changes.

Obstructive sleep apnea happens when air flow pauses or decreases because of a narrowed or blocked airway during sleep. Not everyone who snores has sleep apnea.

Other factors that increase your risk include the shape and condition of the airway, large tonsils, large neck size, large tongue, and obesity.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Besides gathering a health history and performing a physical exam, your doctor might order a sleep study. Signals from electrodes placed on your body record your heart rate and breathing during different stages of sleep. The goal of treatment is to keep the airway open so that breathing does not stop during sleep.

Treatment options include lifestyle changes, such as weight loss and avoiding alcohol or sedatives at bedtime, surgical procedures, and use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine that keeps the airway open using air pressure.

What you can do now about obstructive sleep apnea

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our primary care team.
  2. If your primary care provider has asked you to see a sleep specialist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our sleep clinic team.
  3. Ask your doctor these questions about your sleep health:
    1. Do I need a sleep study?
    2. What are the health risks associated with sleep apnea?
    3. What lifestyle changes can I make to help treat sleep apnea?
    4. Will I need to wear a CPAP device?

Testosterone Level

Learn more about low testosterone.

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Signs of Low Testosterone (Low T)

The signs can be physical, emotional and sexual.

  • Physical signs include: fatigue, decreased muscle mass, loss of hair, hot flushes and sweats.
  • Mental or emotional signs include: feeling sad or blue, less motivation to do things, less self-confidence and enthusiasm, poor concentration and memory.
  • Sexual signs include: reduced sex drive, erectile dysfunction.

Cause

When a man's body produces less than normal testosterone, the condition is called low testosterone or low T.

Who is at risk?

Approximately 40 percent of men over age 45 may have low testosterone, and the likelihood of being affected rises as men get older. Low T is more common in men who are:

  • obese
  • type-2 diabetic
  • have high cholesterol
  • have high blood pressure

Diagnosis and Treatment

Based on symptoms you may be experiencing, you may want to have your testosterone levels checked by a blood test. Treatment for the condition includes testosterone gels, patches and injections.

What you can do now about low testosterone

  • Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our Internal Medicine care team.
  • If your primary care provider has asked you to see a urologist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our urology care team.
  • Ask your doctor these questions about low testosterone:
    1. What is the cause of my low testosterone?
    2. Is testosterone replacement an option for me?
    3. When should I get my testosterone level retested?

Sexual Health

Learn more about erectile dysfunction.

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Signs of Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

ED is the persistent inability to achieve or maintain an erection firm enough to have sexual intercourse.

Causes

Many factors can contribute to ED. The three biggest factors are poor blood circulation, often caused by hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, and side-effects of some types of medications.

Who is at risk?

ED affects approximately 1 in 5 American men over the age of 20.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of erectile dysfunction is generally made after a thorough interview about your personal and sexual medical history.

Treatment Options

After a thorough evaluation, your urologist can choose a from a variety of treatment options including:

  • oral prescription medications
  • drug-free assistive devices
  • medications administered as injections or suppositories
  • prosthetic devices implanted in the body

What you can do now about erectile dysfunction

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your doctor. If you don't have a primary care physician, we invite you to make an appointment with our Internal Medicine care team.
  2. If your primary care provider has asked you to see a urologist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our urology care team.
  3. Ask your doctor these questions about erectile dysfunction:
    • What treatment is best for me?
    • How long will I have to take medicine for erectile dysfunction?
    • Am I healthy enough for normal sexual activity?
    • How can I talk with my partner about my problem?
    • Are any of my medicines causing this problem?

Lower Urinary Tract

Learn more about lower urinary tract problems.

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

Signs

Lower urinary tract symptoms could be signs of an enlarged prostate, known as benign prostatic hypertrophy or BPH. However, lower urinary tract symptoms can also be caused by conditions of the bladder. Symptoms may include dribbling at the end of urinating, an inability to urinate, urinary frequency and urgency, or incomplete emptying of your bladder.

Causes

Many factors have been found to contribute to the development of urinary symptoms, including an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH), diabetes, and advancing age. Additionally, in men whose primary symptom is urinating at night (nocturia), it may be a sign of kidney problems.

Who is at risk?

All men over the age of 40 are at risk for development urinary symptoms. Nearly 60% of men will experience one symptom by the age of 60. In men who have fathers with a history of symptoms due to an enlarged prostate are at risk of developing symptoms themselves.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Your doctor should gain a detailed medical history. Other tests may include a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate gland, a urine test to check for blood or infection, and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test to screen for prostate cancer, though prostate cancer rarely presents with urinary symptoms. Treatment may include medications that affect muscles within the prostate and decrease its size. In severe cases, surgical resection of the prostate may be required.

What you can do now about urinary incontinence

  1. Schedule a complete physical with your primary care provider.
  2. If your primary care provider has asked you to see a urologist or if you are looking for a second opinion, we invite you to make an appointment with our urology care team.
  3. Ask your doctor these questions about lower urinary tract symptoms:
    1. What are the symptoms of an enlarged prostate?
    2. Will these symptoms get worse?
    3. How do I know my problem is not prostate cancer?
    4. What are my options for treatment?

Thank You for using the University of Iowa Health Care Men's Health Online Assessment

The feedback you receive is not meant to replace your own physician's advice.

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics offers complete resources for men's health, including primary care and specialty care in cardiology, urology, psychiatry, sleep disorders, and surgery.

We invite you to make an appointment at UI Health Care – Iowa River Landing. In this one convenient spot just off I-80 in Coralville, you can be seen by a number of specialists who can assess your health and begin to address your particular concerns.

Call for an Appointment: 319-467-2000

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Members of the University of Iowa Men’s Health Clinic acknowledge the following sources that were consulted in the development of the Iowa Men’s Health Assessment.

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