Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship 

The Neuro-Ophthalmology Program at the University of Iowa bridges the fields of ophthalmology and neurology through diagnosis and management of patients with neurological disorders that affect vision and eye movements. Approximately 3,000 clinical neuro-ophthalmology patients are evaluated in the Neuro-Ophthalmology service each year. The evaluations include the entire range of afferent, efferent and pupil abnormalities thereby providing a diverse and challenging fellowship experience.

Purpose and Objectives

The fellowship is designed to provide additional training in neuro-ophthalmology for an ophthalmologist or neurologist who has completed an approved residency. The fellow will be expected:

  • to acquire a special expertise in the diagnosis and management of neuro-ophthalmic problems,
  • to be able to conduct clinical research in neuro-ophthalmology, and
  • to learn how to be an effective teacher of neuro-ophthalmology.

To achieve these goals, the fellow will have to acquire a firm grasp of visual and ocular motor neuroanatomy, the neuropathology of vision and eye movement, the theory, practice, and interpretation of perimetry, electrophysiology of the visual system, and imaging of the eye (including optical coherence tomography). The fellow will also acquire expertise in the reading of CT and MR scans, and achieve a working understanding of the autonomic physiology and pharmacology of the eye.

Terms 

The Fellowship is for a 12-month period (unless other arrangements are made). An optional second year is available for those particularly interested in clinical investigations. 

One fellow is accepted at a time (with occasional exceptions, more than one fellow may be accepted, when additional funding is available). 

The University of Iowa Neuro-Ophthalmology Fellowship program is compliant with Association of University Professors of Ophthalmlogy (AUPO) Fellowship Compliance Committee (FCC) process described at the link below.

Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Neuro-Ophthalmology  (pdf)

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